Kishida to be the PM of Japan: Won Election by Defying Polls

The former Foreign Minister of Japan, Fumio Kishida, has finally been appointed as a new leader of Japan's ruling party. His victory has paved the way for him to be the next Prime Minister of Japan.

Enjoying the support of the party's heavyweights, Kishida's success became possible as he defeated the favorite Taro Kono, who was expected to come at the top.

The ruling Liberal Democratic Party of Japan (LDP) has a majority in the lower house of the parliament, which will unilaterally help Kishida get elected as Prime Minister of Japan.

Kishida was expected to face problems due to his tepid profile, but he stood victorious in the elections.

His election is considered as a win for the populist narrative in Japan, as he reiterated to ease wealth division in the country.

His advocacy to stand against the concentration of wealth in only a few hands is in line with the popular voices in Japan.

 

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The Liberal Democratic Party of Japan has elected Fumio kishida as their new leader who will assume prime ministership soon

The Liberal Democratic Party of Japan has elected Fumio Kishida as their new leader who will assume prime ministership soon

The Subsequent Regime Changes in Japan Have Weakened Government

COVID-19 dispatched two Japanese Prime Ministers in short order when Prime Minister Yoshida Suga announced that he would not seek re-election.

Former PM Abe was forced to step down with his poor response to COVID-19 and halting economic expansion due to the consumption tax increase.

The efficient and fabled top-down leadership of Abe's administration was humbled by the pandemic.

After Abe left the office, the LPD pushed Suga in, who served as the right-hand man of Abe and has been serving on important positions such as chief cabinet secretary.

Suga was to serve the remaining time of Abe's period and amend the mistakes of Abe, especially in matters related to pandemics and the economy.

When Suga came in, he enjoyed public support with a nearly 75 percent approval rating.

However, in recent weeks, the support has been dwindling to around 30 percent. When Suga announced not to seek re-election, many candidates saw this as an opportunity for their political careers and jumped in the political show.

 

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Polls Predicted Kono's Win, Kishida Stole the Show

A poll conducted by Asahi Newspaper suggested that 110 LDP lawmakers backed Kishida, and the same number favored Kono. On the other hand, Takaichi had the support of 80 lawmakers, with Noda in last with only 20 lawmakers.

Another poll conducted by Kyodo News among LDP members found out that 47 percent of the party members favored Kono, while 22 percent backed Kishida.

Takaichi and Noda had the support of 16.2 percent and 3 percent of party members, respectively.

Vaccination Minister Taro Kono emerged as the most popular and favored candidate for the next Prime Minister of Japan. The polls also suggested the same, but at the end of the day, Kishida emerged victorious, defying all odds and polls.

Now Kishida faces three immediate challenges after his election to the prime ministership. Dealing with the pandemic, the economy, and China need to be his priorities in these trying times.

With a crowded election, COVID-19 infections are expected to grow in the coming weeks and create a challenge for politicians and health care providers.

Fumio Kishida's win is considered as a win of populism in Japan. The old school fashioned political leader defied all the polls and emerged as the most powerful politician of the country.

Fumio Kishida's win is considered as a win of populism in Japan. The old school fashioned political leader defied all the polls and emerged as the most powerful politician of the country.

Final Thoughts

Kishida is going to be the 100th Prime Minister of Japan soon.

Tackling the pandemic should be the urgency for the new prime minister, as the threat to Japan's healthcare system remains prevalent with every new COVID wave, despite the fact that the disease did not outbreak like the rest of the world in Japan.

The country also owns a larger number of hospital beds compared to other nations.

Fixing the economy is also what the general public is looking for in Japan. So, the new Prime Minister needs to make sure that he fixes this mess before it's too late for Japan.