Does Your Vote Really Matter? An Eye-Opener For Global Voters

All democratic countries give their citizens the power to vote, which is safeguarded under the constitution.

The one-person, one-vote regime apparently makes you believe that your vote really matters. However, still, the question persists and is one of the most widely pursued ones; i.e., does your vote really matter?

If you live in the US, you may wonder if people living in the swing states can have a greater influence with their votes compared to those living in either pure red or blue states.

Politicians, that is why you must put more of your energy and donations into these states to win them.

And then comes the power of undecided voters who won most of the traction during election cycles, compared to the party loyalists, who may feel neglected during elections.

When we see the pros and cons of the electoral college, it is quite evident that voters in some states weigh more than others.

The power of a single vote is solely a matter of where you are casting that vote. In countries other than the US, where the parliamentary system persists, the story is the same.

In India, for example, politicians are always worried about the battleground constituencies, where one vote can make or break elections for them.

But is not casting a vote ever an option? Let’s see.

One of the cons of electoral college is that not all the votes matter equally in this system as swing voters have more power

One of the cons of electoral college is that not all the votes matter equally in this system as swing voters have more power

Down’s Paradox: When Voters do Cost-Benefit Analysis before Voting

Voters often fall into the stigma of the voting paradox, often known as Down’s paradox. It suggests that the cost of casting a ballot exceeds the potential benefits which voter gets in return. 

While this is one of the reasons for voter apathy and voter fatigue which results in low voter turnouts, this paradox is also the primary motive why people ask questions like do their vote really matter.

Most of the voters who believe in the voting paradox do not vote just because they think that they are not getting any direct benefit from voting.

While each and every politician promote one policy set or other, voters fail to make a direct connection with the politicians, resulting in them believing in the voting paradox.

Your vote really matters as some of the elections in the recent history have been so close that they went tied due to the voters not turning up for voting

Your vote really matters as some of the elections in the recent history have been so close that they went tied due to the voters not turning up for voting

Does Your Vote Really Matter? Certainly Yes; Skipping the Ballot Should Never be a Choice

Numerous close contested elections have been seen in history, where even one vote could have turned the result.

Consider the following elections, for instance, and how they were affected by a small number of votes.

 

Elections Results Comments
Massachusetts House of Representatives election from 6th Worcester district in 2010 Election tied A contestant won the election by 56 votes in the runoff race
1963 House of Commons Elections in Canada Election tied Returning officer cast his vote in favor of one candidate to declare him the winner.
1978 Rhode Island Senatorial District 29 Election tied One contestant beat the other in a special election
1994 Wyoming House of Representatives Race Election tied The Republican candidate was declared the winner by drawing from a hat.

 

These are not the exclusive races that were decided by a matter of some votes. A lot of races have been decided by these small margins, which resulted in people been thinking that their votes do matter really.

The message is clear here that even a single vote can turn the elections completely for or against the candidate.

The problem, undoubtedly, is a collective phenomenon. While a single vote may likely just be an addition to the bulk, when all the people think along the same lines, it makes a difference.

Thinking your vote is useless results in voter alienation, which is one of the emerging social problems.

 

Final Thoughts

The time to cast a vote can vary from country to country. However, in most countries, the process of voting can be completed within fifteen to twenty minutes.

In the developed democracies which provide their citizens more luxury, the vote can be cast within ten minutes.

So, the cost of casting a vote in terms of time should never be an issue, even for the busiest of voters.

However, if voters do believe that no candidate deserves their vote, it is always advisable to vote for the candidate that is better than the crowd because one of the politicians would be elected anyway.

The US voters can explore platforms like the Patnuvotes.app to see if the candidate deserves their vote or not before making a choice.